Appendix A: The Emigrants

Introduction

This appendix names the families and individuals who traveled with the Baker and Fancher companies during the journey from Arkansas toward California. The list is separated into three parts. Part I identifies persons known to have perished in the massacre and the seventeen surviving children. Part II names those who traveled for a time with the ill-fated companies but separated from them before the massacre. Part III lists persons often tied to the emigrant companies for whom there is no conclusive evidence they traveled with them or were killed at Mountain Meadows.

Part I: Emigrants Known to Have Perished at Mountain Meadows and the Seventeen Children Who Survived

Names of the surviving children appear in italics. These children were placed in Utah homes after the massacre of their families and in some cases were renamed. According to Mormon practice, new children in a family, including adopted children, are named and blessed in local congregational meetings. This ceremony is not the same as christening or baptism by which people enter into the faith; rather it is intended as a blessing to guide the child’s life.1

The lists are arranged alphabetically by family name and then by age within each immediate family group. Children’s names are indented after the names of their parents. Listed after each name is the person’s age at the time of the massacre. Ages are approximated from federal census records and other available family history resources. Letters at the end of each entry indicate which individuals were memorialized as victims of the massacre on monuments in Harrison, Arkansas, and at Mountain Meadows, as well as in a program published for the 1999 memorial service at Mountain Meadows. H designates the Harrison, Arkansas, monument, dedicated in November 1955; M the Mountain Meadows monument, dedicated September 15, 1990; and MS the program for the memorial service held when some of the victims’ remains were re-interred at Mountain Meadows on September 10, 1999.

Aden, William Allen, 19. From Henry County, Tennessee, where his father, a prominent doctor, had once sheltered Mormon missionary William Leany. Aden crossed the plains with another train but joined the Arkansas company around Parowan, where he visited Leany. He was shot on Monday, September 7, at Leach’s Spring by William C. Stewart.2 H, M, MS
Baker, George W., 27. A son of John Twitty Baker, he traveled to California during the Gold Rush, spending time in Stockton, Sonora, and Columbia. He planned on settling in California. According to his daughter, Sarah Frances, he was wounded before the final massacre and was loaded in one of the lead wagons.3 H, M, MS
Baker, Manerva Ann Beller, 25. Older sister of David W. and Melissa Ann Beller. H, M, MS
Mary Lovina, 7. During the massacre, her sister, Martha, saw her being led by a couple of men over a ridge.4 H, M, MS
Martha Elizabeth, 5. After the massacre, she was left with Amos Thornton’s family at Pinto. She was blessed a month after the massacre and given the name of Betsy Whittaker. Martha was recovered by government officials in 1859 and returned to Arkansas. She later married James William Terry of Harrison, Arkansas, and was residing there at her death in 1940. Near the end of her life, several massacre accounts attributed to her were published.5 H, M, MS
Sarah Frances, 2. She remembered that before the final massacre she was loaded in a wagon with both wounded parents, her sister Martha, and her brother William. She said the same bullet that killed her father took a nick out of her left ear. She was later recovered from the home of Charles Hopkins in Cedar City. She eventually married Joseph A. Gladden and moved to Muskogee, Oklahoma. After Gladden’s death, she married Manley C. Mitchell. She died in Muskogee in 1947.6 H, M, MS
William Twitty, 9 months. He was recovered from the home of Sarah and David Williams in Cedar City. William later worked as a farmer, married twice and was the father of fourteen children. He died in Searcy County, Arkansas, in 1937.7 H, M, MS
Baker, John Twitty, 52. An imposing figure with a long beard, Jack Baker, as he was commonly known, organized an emigrant company of his family and friends at Beller’s Stand, near Harrison, Arkansas, in the spring of 1857. He left his wife, Mary, and some grown children in Carroll County and planned to meet up with them again after selling his cattle in California. His train eventually joined with another group organized by Alexander Fancher. According to one of the surviving children, Nancy Saphrona Huff, Jack was carrying her in his arms when he was killed.8 H, M, MS
Baker, Abel, 19. He was probably one of three men who left the wagon corral during the week of the massacre to seek help in California. He made it as far as the Cottonwoods beyond Las Vegas, when he came upon two Mormon brothers returning to Utah from San Bernardino, California. They took him under their protection until he was discovered and killed by a group of Paiutes led by Mormon militiaman Ira Hatch.9H, M, MS
Beach, John, 21. He stood four feet six inches and was known for being very dextrous. He was probably hired as a drover for the cattle.10 M, MS
Beller, David W., 12. Brother of Manerva Ann Beller Baker. An orphan in the custody of George Baker.11 H, M, MS
Beller, Melissa Ann, 14. Sister of Manerva Ann Beller Baker. An orphan in the custody of George Baker.12 H, M, MS
Cameron, William, 51. He lived in Carroll County before moving to Johnson County, Arkansas, his home previous to his journey west.13 H, M, MS
Cameron, Martha, 51. H, M, MS
Tillman, 24. He owned the racehorse called “One-Eye Blaze.” He had been in business at Fort Smith, Arkansas, before joining his family on the trip west.14 M, MS
Isom, 18. M, MS
Henry, 16. M, MS
James, 14. M, MS
Martha, 11. M, MS
Larkin, 8. M, MS
Cameron, Nancy, 12. Niece of William Cameron.15 M, MS
Cooper, William E., 29. A carriage maker by trade, he and his wife, Abbey, were living in Davenport, Scott County, Iowa in 1856.16
Cooper, Abbey, 29.
Deshazo, Allen P., 22. Brother-in-law of John H. Baker, who was John Twitty Baker’s son. He left Arkansas with John T. Baker’s company, taking with him a small cattle herd and a violin. He may have worked as a cattle drover during the trip.17 H, M, MS
Dunlap, Jesse, Jr., 39. Brother of Lorenzo D. Dunlap. Also the brother-in-law and mercantile partner of William C. Mitchell, a former Arkansas state senator and father of Charles and Joel Mitchell.18H, M, MS
Dunlap, Mary Wharton, 39. Sister of Nancy Wharton Dunlap. H, M, MS
Ellender, 18. M, MS
Nancy M., 16. M, MS
James D., 14. M, MS
Lucinda, 12. Twin sisters Lucinda and Susannah were reportedly murdered after most of the emigrants were already dead.19 M, MS
Susannah, 12. M, MS
Margarette, 11. M, MS
Mary Ann, 9.20 M, MS
Rebecca Jane, 6. She claimed that David Tullis killed one of her parents. She also held Albert Hamblin responsible for the death of her twin sisters. She lived at the home of Jacob and Rachel Hamblin until 1859, when she was returned to Arkansas. She married John Wesley Evins and resided in Calhoun and then Drew County, Arkansas. Her account of the massacre was published in 1897. She died in 1914.21 H, M, MS
Louisa, 4. Was living with Jacob Hamblin when she was recovered in 1859. She eventually married James M. Linton and settled first in Pope County, Arkansas, and later in Oklahoma. She died in 1926.22 H, M, MS
Sarah Elizabeth, 1. She was “shot through one of her arms, below the elbow, by a large ball, breaking both bones, and cutting the arm half off.” While living with the Hamblins she developed an eye infection and eventually went blind. She later married James Lynch, who assisted in recovering the surviving children. She died in 1901.23 H, M, MS
Dunlap, Lorenzo Dow, 42. Brother of Jesse Dunlap Jr. and brother-in-law of William C. Mitchell.24 H, M, MS
Dunlap, Nancy Wharton, 42. Sister of Mary Wharton Dunlap. M, MS
Thomas J., 18. M, MS
John H., 16. M, MS
Mary Ann, 13. M, MS
Talitha Emaline, 11. M, MS
Nancy, 9. M, MS
America Jane, 7. M, MS
Prudence Angeline, 5. She lived with the Samuel Jewkes family in Cedar City and was blessed and given the name Angeline Jewkes on April 24, 1858. She was recovered and returned to Arkansas in 1859. She married Claiborne Hobbs Koen and settled in Texas. She died in 1918.25 H, M, MS
Georgia Ann, 18 months. After the massacre, she first lived in the home of Philip Klingensmith, who later gave her to Jane and Richard Birkbeck in Cedar City. On October 24, 1857, she was blessed and given the name Eliza K. Smith. After her return to Arkansas, she eventually married George Marshall McWhirter and settled in Dallas, Texas. She died in 1920.26 H, M, MS
Eaton, William M., adult, age unknown. Originally from Indiana, he appears to have been farming in Illinois when he met some Arkansans visiting relatives who were planning to travel west. He sold his farm and took his wife and child back to Indiana before joining the emigrants.27 H, M, MS
Edwards, Silas, 26. After the massacre, Isaac Haight was seen riding Edwards’s large bay horse.28 M, MS
Fancher, Alexander, 45. Described as “tall, slim, erect, of dark complexion, a singer, and a born leader and organizer of men.” He served in the Carroll County militia to end the Tutt-Everett War in neighboring Marion County, Arkansas. He led his own company west and probably captained the combined Arkansas company that formed in Salt Lake City before heading south. He was reportedly killed in one of the early attacks previous to the final massacre.29 H, M, MS
Fancher, Eliza Ingram, 33. H, M, MS
Hampton, 19. H, M, MS
William, 17. H, M, MS
Mary, 15. H, M, MS
Thomas, 14. H, M, MS
Martha, 10. H, M, MS
Margaret A., 8. H, M, MS
Sarah G., 8. H, M, MS
Christopher “Kit” Carson, 5. Following the massacre, he was taken to the home of John D. Lee at Harmony. On November 1, 1857, he was blessed and given the name Charles Lee. He and his sister Triphenia were taken back to Arkansas in 1859, where he died in 1873 at the home of his cousin Hampton Bynum Fancher.30 H, M, MS
Triphenia D., 22 months. She was recovered from the home of Elenor and Joseph H. Smith in Cedar City. She married James Chaney Wilson and had eleven children. She died in Carroll County, Arkansas in 1897.31 H, M, MS
Fancher, James Mathew, 25. Cousin of Alexander Fancher and brother of Robert Fancher. Commonly known as Matt Fancher, he lived in Carroll County, Arkansas, before going west.32 H, M, MS
Fancher, Frances “Fanny” Fulfer, age unknown.33 M, MS
Fancher, Robert, 19. Cousin of Alexander Fancher and brother of James M. Fancher.34 H, M, MS
Gresly, John, 21. Possibly the man identified as the troublesome “German” or “Dutchman” alluded to in massacre accounts. Born in Pennsylvania to German parents.35
Hamilton. Emigrant Francis Eaton King identified a Hamilton with the Arkansas companies. John D. Lee said a man named Hamilton met him outside of the emigrant’s corral before the final massacre and acted as the emigrants’ spokesman.36 H, M, MS
Huff, Saladia Ann Brown, 38. Saladia’s husband, Peter Huff, died en route before reaching Salt Lake City. The Huffs were living in Benton County, Arkansas, when they sold their property in March 1857 in preparation to settle in California. Her daughter Nancy Saphrona remembered seeing her shot in the forehead and fall dead during the massacre.37 H, M, MS
John, 14. Likely one of the unidentified Huff sons listed on the monuments. M, MS
William C., 13. M, MS
Mary E., 11.
James K., 8. Likely one of the unidentified Huff sons listed on the monuments. M, MS
Nancy Saphrona, 4. She remembered being held in the arms of John Twitty Baker when he was killed, and also witnessed her mother being shot. She stated, “At the close of the massacre there was 18 children still alive, one girl, some ten or twelve years old they said was t[o]o big and could tell so they killed her, leaving 17.” In 1859 she was recovered in Toquerville, Utah, at the home of Frances and John Willis, who had moved from Cedar City a year earlier. After being retrieved in 1859 she went to live with her maternal grandfather in Tennessee. She married George Dallas Cates and moved to Yell County, Arkansas. In 1875 at the same time of the first John D. Lee trial, her account of the massacre was published. She died in 1878.38 H, M, MS
son, age unknown.39
Jones, John Milum, 32. Brother of Newton Jones and son-in-law of Cyntha Tackitt. He left Johnson County, Arkansas, along with his brother, the Tackitts, the Poteets, and others.40 H, M, MS
Jones, Eloah Angeline Tackitt, 26. Daughter of Cyntha Tackitt. H, M, MS
child, age unknown.41 H, M, MS
Felix Marion, 18 months. Government officials misidentified Felix as “Elisha Huff” and also “Ephraim Huff” when they recovered him from the home of Mary Ann and William C. Stewart in Cedar City. Later, after his return to Arkansas, he moved to Texas where he married Martha Ann Reed and fathered five children. He died in 1932.42 H, M, MS
Jones, Newton, 23. Brother and business partner of John M. Jones. Newton owned oxen and half the wagon that he and his brother used to go west.43 M, MS
McEntire, Lawson A., 21. His brother, John, had gone west several years earlier, but died of tuberculosis in Salt Lake City. Lawson probably worked as a drover for the wagon train.44 H, M, MS
Miller, Josiah (Joseph), 30. The uncle of Armilda Miller Tackitt, he and his family lived in Crawford County, Arkansas, before heading west.45 H, M, MS
Miller, Matilda Cameron, 26. Daughter of William and Martha Cameron. H, M, MS
James William, 9. M, MS
John Calvin, 6. Government officials originally identified the surviving Miller children with the surname of “Sorel.” In one of the most poignant details of the massacre, John remembered pulling arrows from the back of his mother’s body until she died. Afterwards, he was taken into the home of the Elisha H. Groves family in Harmony. He was blessed and given the name of John Groves on November 1, 1857. Because he was one of the oldest children to survive the massacre he was taken to Washington D.C. to be “examined by the government” of what he remembered.46 H, M, MS
Mary, 4. She was recovered from the home of the John Morris family in Cedar City. Little else is known about her later life.47 H, M, MS
Joseph, 1. He was taken to the home of Agnes and Alexander Ingram at Harmony. He was blessed and given the name Louis Gordon Ingram on November 1, 1857. He was the last of the surviving children to be recovered in 1859, when he was retrieved from the Ingrams, who by that time were living in Pocketville. As an adult, he went by the name of William Tillman Miller. He married Brancey Ann Reese Boyd or Boyed in Navarro County, Texas, and was the father of six children. He later moved to California and died in Turlock, Stanislaus County, California in 1940.48 H, M, MS
Mitchell, Charles R., 25. Brother of Joel D. Mitchell, son of prominent Arkansan William C. Mitchell, and nephew of Jesse and Lorenzo Dunlap. From Carroll County, Arkansas.49 H, M, MS
Mitchell, Sarah C. Baker, 21. Daughter of John Twitty Baker. H, M, MS
John, infant. H, M, MS
Mitchell, Joel D., 23. Brother of Charles R. Mitchell, son of William C. Mitchell, and nephew of Jesse and Lorenzo Dunlap.50 H, M, MS
Prewit, John, 20. Brother of William Prewit. From Marion County, Arkansas, he was probably hired as a drover.51 H, M, MS
Prewit, William, 18. Brother of John Prewit. He was probably hired as a drover.52 H, M, MS
Rush, Milum Lafayette, 29. His wife and two young children remained in Arkansas.53 H, M, MS
Tackitt, Cyntha, 49. Commonly known as “Widow Tackitt” because her husband, Martin Tackitt, had died several years before she traveled west. She and her family left from Johnson County, Arkansas, and were traveling to Tuolumne County, California, where one of her sons resided.54 H, M, MS
William H., 23. H
Marion, 20. H, M, MS
Sebron, 18. M, MS
Matilda, 16. M, MS
James M., 14. M, MS
Jones M., 12. M, MS
Tackitt, Pleasant, 25. Son of Cyntha Tackitt, he left from Johnson County, Arkansas.55 H, M, MS
Tackitt, Armilda Miller, 22. The niece of Josiah (Joseph) Miller.56 H, M, MS
Emberson Milum, 4. He recalled his aunt Eloah Tackitt Jones using a slain emigrant’s gun to fight back during the first attack against the emigrants. After the massacre, he was taken to the home of the John M. Higbee family in Cedar City. After he was recovered in 1859, he accompanied Jacob Forney to Washington D.C. to be “examined by the government” about what he remembered. He married Mary Bilinda Snow of Carroll County, Arkansas. He later settled in Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona, where he served as a deputy sheriff. He was reportedly the only one of the surviving children to visit Mountain Meadows as an adult. He died in 1912.57 H, M, MS
William Henry, 19 months. Until his recovery in 1859 he stayed in the home of the Elias Morris family and was blessed with the name Albert Morris on October 24, 1857. He eventually married Viney Harris and settled on Shoal Creek above Protem, Taney County, Missouri. He died in 1891.58 H, M, MS
Wilson, Richard, 27. He was from Marion County, Arkansas. According to family tradition he was going to the gold fields in California. Richard Wilson is the only known Wilson individual from Marion County, Arkansas; however, the present-day Wilson family believe their ancestor’s name was John Calvin Wilson.59 H, M, MS
Wood, Solomon R., 20. Brother of William Wood and brother-in-law to Charles Stallcup and James Larramore, two men sometimes associated with the company. He was probably hired as a drover.60 H, M, MS
Wood, William Edward, 26. Brother of Solomon Wood and brother-in-law to Charles Stallcup and James Larramore, two men sometimes associated with the company. He was probably hired as a drover.61 H, M, MS
Others unknown.62

Notes for Appendix A, Part I

1 See Lowell Bangerter, “Blessing of Children,” Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow (New York: Macmillan Publishing, 1992), 268.

2 Sidney B. Aden to Brigham Young, March 14, May 30, 1859, Incoming Correspondence, Brigham Young, Office Files, Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Salt Lake City, UT [hereafter cited as LDS Church History Library]; Brigham Young to S. B. Aden, April 27, July 12, 1859, Letterpress Copybook 5:116, 185, Young Office Files; “Information Wanted,” Salt Lake City Valley Tan, June 22, 1859; Josiah F. Gibbs, The Mountain Meadows Massacre (Salt Lake City: Salt Lake Tribune, 1910), 12; Tennessee, Henry County, District 1, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 241; William Leany, Reminiscence, 1888, 21-22, LDS Church History Library; Ellott Willden, in Andrew Jenson, Interviews, January and February 1892, Archives of the First Presidency, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Salt Lake City, UT; Andrew Jenson, notes from discussion with Ellott Willden, ca. January 29-30, 1892, Mountain Meadows file, Andrew Jenson, Collection [ca. 1871-1942], LDS Church History Library; “Supposed to be Murdered in Mormondom,” San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, August 8, 1859. According to William Aden’s father, Sidney B. Aden, William stood six feet tall, was between 160 and 175 pounds, and had a fair complexion, blue eyes, and dark, curly hair. “Supposed to be Murdered in Mormondom.”

3 “Public Meeting of the People of Carroll County,” Arkansas State Gazette and Democrat, February 27, 1858; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Bureau of Indian Affairs, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Utah Superintendency Papers, National Archives Microfilm Publications 234, National Archives, Washington, D.C., microfilm copy at LDS Church History Library; Joseph B. Baines, William C. Beller, John H. Baker, and Irvin T. Beller, depositions regarding the property of George W. Baker, October 23, 1860, Papers Pertaining to the Territory of Utah, 1849-70, 36th Congress, Records of the Senate, RG 46, National Archives, Washington, D.C.; Clyde R. Greenhaw, “Survivor of a Massacre: Mrs. Betty Terry of Harrison Vividly Recalls Massacre of Westbound Arkansas Caravan in Utah More than 80 Years Ago,” Arkansas Gazette, Sunday Section, September 4, 1938; Sallie Baker Mitchell, “The Mountain Meadows Massacre—An Episode on the Road to Zion,” American Weekly (August 25, 1940): 15; P., October 29, 1857, in “Letter from Angel’s Camp,” Daily Alta California, November 1, 1857; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 163B.

4 Greenhaw, “Survivor of a Massacre”; Elizabeth Baker Terry, in “I Survived the Mountain Meadow Massacre,” True Story Magazine, copy at L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT; Mitchell, “Episode on the Road to Zion,” 10. The portion describing Mary being led off by some men is not included in Ralph R. Rea, “The Mountain Meadows Massacre and Its Completion as a Historic Episode,” Arkansas Historical Quarterly 16, no. 1 (Spring 1957): 34.

5 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Wm. C. Mitchell to Elias N. Conway, October 11, 1860, in James H. Carleton, Report on the Subject of the Massacre at the Mountain Meadows, in Utah Territory, in September, 1857, of One Hundred and Twenty Men, Women and Children, Who Were from Arkansas (Little Rock, AR: True Democrat Steam Press, 1860), 32; [Lt. Kearny], “List of the Children Saved from the Mountain Meadows Massacre,” Los Angeles Southern Vineyard, June 3, 1859; Terry, in “I Survived the Mountain Meadow Massacre,” 43–49, 94–96; Greenhaw, “Survivor of a Massacre”; Arkansas, Boone County, Crooked Creek Township, 1900 U.S. Census, population schedule, E. D. 26, sheet 2, 154; “Lives 83 Years after Surviving Massacre, Mrs. Martha E. Terry,” as published in Boone County Historian 11, no. 1 (1988): 58; Philip Klingensmith, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Jacob S. Boreman Transcript, 3:21-22, 89, Jacob S. Boreman Collection, Huntington Library, San Marino, CA; Judy Gladden, “Baker Families,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2231556&id=I118541379&printer_friendly (accessed July 7, 2008). “Betsy Whittaker” was blessed on October 24, 1857. Other children who were blessed with the names Maria Smith, blessed October 24, 1857, and Ellen Maria Smith, blessed in February 1858, are also likely to be surviving children of the massacre; however, there is not enough documentation to identify which specific children were blessed with those names. Cedar City Stake, Record of Children Blessed, 1856-1863, LDS Church History Library.

6 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Mitchell, “Episode on the Road to Zion,” 10–11, 15, 18; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Arkansas, Boone County, Jackson Township, 1900 U.S. Census, population schedule, E.D. 22, sheet 11, 11B; Oklahoma, Tulsa County, Bixby Township, 1920 U.S. Census, population schedule, E.D. 201, 10A; Oklahoma State Death Certificate for Sarah Frances Mitchell, #14766, October 4, 1947, Muskogee, Oklahoma. John W. Bradshaw claimed Charles Hopkins had two of the surviving children. Only Sarah Francis Baker was recovered from his home in 1859. If the Hopkins did have another child, it was likely only temporary since Charles’ wife Lydia assisted Klingensmith in finding homes for the children. John W. Bradshaw, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:80; Philip Klingensmith, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 3:22.

7 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; “W. T. Baker, Survivor of Famous Massacre, Dies at Leslie Home,” Marshall (AR) Mountain Wave, February 5, 1937; Jennifer Jones, “Arkansas Families,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3079790&id=I592979133&printer_friendly (accessed July 7, 2008).

8 “Public Meeting”; “Extract from a Letter to the Editor, Dated Carroll Co., Jan. 5, 1858,” Arkansas State Gazette and Democrat, February 13, 1858; Jack Baker Holt, “One of the Baker Families of Carroll (Boone) County Arkansas,” transcript of tape, in Boone County Historian 5, no. 3 (Fall 1982): 162, 164; S. B. Honea, account, in “More Outrages on the Plains,” Los Angeles Star, October 24, 1857; Wm. C. Mitchell to A. B. Greenwood, April 27, 1860, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mary Baker, John H. Baker, John Crabtree, and Hugh A. Torrance, depositions regarding the property of John T. Baker, October 22, 23, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; P., October 29, 1857, in “Letter from Angel’s Camp”; “The Mountain Meadow Mas[s]acre: Statement of Mrs. G. D. Cates, One of the Children Spared at the Time,” Arkansas Independent, August 27, 1875, reprinted in “The Mountain Meadow Massacre: Statement of One of the Few Survivors,” Daily Arkansas Gazette, September 1, 1875; B. G. Parker, Recollections of the Mountain Meadow Massacre (Plano, CA: Fred W. Reed, 1901), 4–6; “Mountain Meadow Massacre: The Butchery of a Train of Arkansans by Mormons and Indians While on Their Way to California, Related by One of the Survivors,” Fort Smith Elevator, August 20, 1897; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 163B.

9 “Public Meeting”; “Extract from a Letter”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Roger V. Logan, “The Mountain Meadows Massacre,” in Mountain Heritage: Some Glimpses into Boone County’s Past after One Hundred Years, ed. Roger v. Logan Jr. (Harrison, AR: Times Publishing, 1969), 26, 29; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 163B. Abel Baker was likely the person identified as William Baker by Stephen B. Honea. Honea was told by Ira Hatch that “young Baker” was the emigrant who made it as far as the Muddy, but was eventually met by Hatch and killed. “More Outrages on the Plains”; C. F. McGlashan, “The Mountain Meadow Massacre,” Sacramento Daily Record, January 1, 1875; Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 24–26.

10 S. C. Turnbo, Ozark Frontier Stories, indexed by Carrie Basch (n.p., 1979), 1:138–39. John Beach is identified as John Burch in Logan, “Mountain Meadows Massacre,” 26.

11 William C. Beller and John H. Baker, depositions regarding the property of George W. Baker, October 23, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 162.

12 Joseph B. Baines, William C. Beller, and John H. Baker, depositions regarding the property of George W. Baker, October 23, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 162.

13 “Public Meeting”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Malinda Cameron Scott Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 1459, October 15, 1877, 45th Congress, 1st Session, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy of transcript in LDS Church History Library; Malinda Cameron Scott Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 18, 1877, 45th Congress, 2nd Session, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy of transcript in LDS Church History Library; Malinda Cameron Scott Thurston, deposition, May 2, 1911, Malinda Thurston v. The United States and Ute Indian, U.S. Court of Claims, no. 8479, in Selected Documents Relating to the Mountain Meadows Massacre, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy at LDS Church History Library; “Mrs. M. Thurston Has Passed Away,” Stockton Daily Evening Record, December 15, 1921; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 159. The 1955 Harrison, Arkansas monument, (based on William C. Mitchell’s list of victims given in the April 27, 1860 letter to Greenwood), indicates that five children of William Cameron and his wife were killed in the massacre but does not give their names. Likewise, William Cameron’s niece Nancy Cameron is not mentioned on the Harrison monument.

14 Thurston, affidavit, October 15, 1877; Thurston, affidavit, December 18, 1877; Thurston, deposition, May 2, 1911, Malinda Thurston v. The United States and Ute Indian; John P. Shaver, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 19, 1877, 45th Congress, 2nd Session, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy of transcript in LDS Church History Library; Joel Scott, deposition, May 2, 1911, Malinda Thurston v. The United States and Ute Indian; “‘Children of the Massacre’ May Meet in Reunion,” Arkansas Sunday Post Dispatch, 1895, also found in Journal History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1857 supplement, p. 5–8, LDS Church History Library; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32. The name Tillman was also spelled Tilghman.

15 Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 1459, October 15, 1877; Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 18, 1877.

16 Iowa, Scott County, Davenport Township, 1856 Iowa State Census (Iowa: Census Board, n.d.), 646. A headstone inscription at Latimer Hill Cemetery, Bloomfield, Connecticut reads, “Wm. E. Cooper, June 4 1828. He and wife were murdered in Mountain Meadow Massacre-Utah, Sept. 11, 1857.”

17 “Public Meeting of the People of Carroll County”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; James Deshazo, Hugh A. Torrance, and Lorenzo D. Rush, depositions regarding the property of Allen Deshazo, October 23, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; Tennessee, Hickman County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 45; “Genealogy Data,” Mountain Meadows Association website, http://www.mtn-meadows-assoc.com/Genealogy/dat15.html#10 (accessed August 2, 2008).

18 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; James D. Dunlap, deposition, October 26, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; “Butchery of a Train”; Parker, Recollections of the Massacre, 5; Roger V. Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships,” broadside of familial relationships of the Baker-Fancher emigrant party, September 9, 2001, copy located in Mountain Meadows Massacre Research Files, LDS Church History Library; Roger V. Logan Jr., “Mitchell,” in History of Boone County, Arkansas (Paducah, KY: Turner Publishing, 1998), 307; Arkansas, Johnson County, Mulberry Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 129B. The Harrison monument indicates that six children of Jesse Dunlap and his wife were killed in the massacre but does not give their names. The three surviving children of Jesse Dunlap, however, are mentioned by name.

19 Albert Hamblin, statement, May 20, 1859, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 14; Jacob Hamblin, statement, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 8; [Peter Shirts], statement, ca. 1876, manuscript 3141, Smithsonian Institution, National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD; Jacob Hamblin, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, Second Trial, Boreman Transcript, 1:94–98.

20 Her sister, Rebecca claimed that Mary was dressed all in white and sent with a white flag to meet with Mormon leaders previous to the final massacre. “Butchery of a Train.” Although several legends have persisted that a child was sent to meet the Mormons with a white flag, the testimonies of those who participated in the massacre state that it was one of the emigrant men, not a child. William Young, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:50–51, 5:205–6; Samuel Knight, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, Second Trial, Boreman Transcript, 1:25; Samuel McMurdy, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, Second Trial, Boreman Transcript, 1:34–35; “Lee’s Confession,” Sacramento Daily Record-Union, March 24, 1877; “Lee’s Last Confession,” San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, March 24, 1877; William W. Bishop, Mormonism Unveiled; or the Life and Confessions of the Late Mormon Bishop, John D. Lee; (Written by Himself) (St. Louis: Bryan, Brand & Co., 1877), 238; Nephi Johnson, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, Second Trial, Boreman Transcript, 1:46; Nephi Johnson, affidavit, July 22, 1908, First Presidency Cumulative Correspondence, 1900-1949, LDS Church History Library; Nephi Johnson, affidavit, November 30, 1909, Collected Material concerning the Mountain Meadows Massacre, LDS Church History Library; Nephi Johnson, conversation with Anthony W. Ivins, September 2, 1917, typescript, Anthony W. Ivins, Collection, Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake City, UT.

21 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton,Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; J[ames] Lynch, statement, in “The Mountain Meadows Massacre: Surviving Children of the Murdered Fix the Crime upon the Mormons,” San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, May 31, 1859; James Lynch, affidavit, July 27, 1859, in U.S. Congress, Senate, Message of the President of the United States, Communicating, in Compliance witha Resolution of the Senate, Information in Relation to the Massacre at Mountain Meadows, and Other Massacres in Utah Territory, 36th Cong., 1st sess., 1860, S. Doc. 42, p. 83; Philip Klingensmith, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 3:89; Jacob Hamblin, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, Second Trial, Boreman Transcript, 1:97–98; “Butchery of a Train”; Isabelle Minnie Evins Kratz, “The Mountain Meadow Massacre,” The Klingensmith Scrapbook, comp. Anna Jean Duncan Backus (1996), 161–64; Arkansas, Calhoun County, Polk Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, E. D. 21, 97; “Descendants of Joshua Wharton,” http://us.geocities.com/schiebert/gen006.htm (accessed June 19, 2008).

22 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Jacob Hamblin, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, Second Trial, Boreman Transcript, 1:97–98; Census record for her married name and using a different given name, Eliza Linton, in Arkansas, Pope County, Liberty Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, E. D. 133, 17; “‘Children of the Massacre’”; Robyn Chambers Carr, telephone interview with David Putnam, January 16, 2002; “Descendants of Joshua Wharton,” http://us.geocities.com/schiebert/gen006.htm (accessed June 19, 2008).

23 Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 7–8, 12; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Wm. H. Rogers, “The Mountain Me[a]dows Massacre,” Valley Tan, February 29, 1860; Jacob Hamblin, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, Second Trial, Boreman Transcript, 1:97–98; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; “A Romantic Marriage,” Southern Standard, January 4, 1894; Arkansas, Pulaski County, Big Rock Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, E. D. 148, 417; Arkansas, Calhoun County, Polk Township, 1900 U.S. Census, population schedule, E.D. 27, Sheet 9, 74; “Descendants of Joshua Wharton,” http://us.geocities.com/schiebert/gen006.htm (accessed June 19, 2008). While contemporary accounts and historical evidence suggest Sarah’s arm was broken from a musket ball, one family legend says Sarah’s arm was broken by an Indian arrow. Kratz, “Mountain Meadow Massacre,” 162.

24 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; William C. Mitchell, deposition regarding the property of Lorenzo Dunlap, October 26, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; Parker, Recollections of the Massacre,5; Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships”; Arkansas, Johnson County, Mulberry Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 129B. The Harrison monument names L. D. Dunlap and five children as victims of the massacre without indicating their names. L. D. Dunlap’s wife is not identified as a victim on the same monument even though she is mentioned in Mitchell’s letter. Also, a Rachel and Ruth Dunlap are named by Frank E. King in Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 13, and on the Harrison monument. There are no other known records of a Rachel or a Ruth Dunlap traveling with the Baker and Fancher companies.

25 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Texas, Mills County, Justice Precinct 2, U.S. Census 1910, population schedule, E.D. 206, 6A; “Koen Family Bible,” Austin Genealogical Society Quarterly 5, no. 4 (December 1964): 141; Mary C. Moody, 1890 Hamilton County, Texas Census: Uniquely Reconstructed & Annotated (Arlington, TX: Blackstone Publishing, 1996), 51; Cedar City Stake, Record of Children Blessed; Lorreta-Marie Dimond, “GeneHistHome Master File,” Rootsweb’s Worldconnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=genehisthome2&id=I41415 (accessed July 7, 2008). In 1892, Cedar City resident Mary Campbell told historian Andrew Jenson that Samuel Jewkes’s family was given two children from the massacre. One of those children, a girl between seven and nine years old, reportedly pointed out her father’s killer and “afterwards disappeared.” Andrew Jenson, notes of discussion with Mary S. Campbell, January 24, 1892, Mountain Meadows file, Jenson Collection; Andrew Jenson, interview with Mary S. Campbell, January 24, 1892, Jenson Interviews. Contemporary records indicate the only child given to Jewkes was Prudence Angeline Dunlap. Because she was five years old at the time of the massacre and seven when she returned to Arkansas, she was likely the one Campbell remembered.

26 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Arkansas, Boone County, Sugar Loaf Township (Lead Hill) 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 608; “McWhirter,” Dallas Morning News, September 23, 1920; Philip Klingensmith, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 3:22, 89; Thomas T. Willis, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:34. John Bradshaw claimed one of the children was left at the home of “William Burbeck.” This is a reference to Richard Birkbeck since there was no William in Cedar City, and one of the children was recovered from Richard’s home. John W. Bradshaw, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:80; Cedar City Stake, Record of Children Blessed.

27 Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 12.

28 Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships”; Holt, “One of the Baker Families,” 160, 161; Honea, account, in “More Outrages on the Plains”; “Silas Edwards,” Mountain Meadows Association website, http://www.mtn-meadows-assoc.com/silasedwards.htm (accessed September 18, 2013).

29 Alexander Fancher, affidavit, Thomas H. Fancher Family Files, Carroll County Historical and Genealogical Society, Berryville, AR; W. B. Flippin, in “The Tutt-Everett War,” in Earl Berry, ed., The History of Marion County (Marion County Historical Association, ca. 1977), 65-70; “Public Meeting”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Parker, Recollections of the Massacre, 5; H. B. Fancher to James C. Wilson, August 2, 1885, James C. Wilson to J. P. Dunn, March 13, 1885, in Jacob Piatt Dunn Collection, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, Indiana; California, San Diego County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 280, recorded March 1, 1851; Benton County, Arkansas, Book of Deeds, vol. D, p. 203, vol. E, pp. 56-57, film no. 1034925, LDS Family History Library; William Bedford Temple to Wife and Children, May 11, June 2, 1850, Oregon Historical Society, Portland, OR; Washington Peck, Diary, December 5, 1850, typescript, National Frontier Trails Center, Independence, MO; Johnson, affidavit, July 22, 1908, First Presidency Cumulative Correspondence. One family historian described Alexander Fancher as “a farmer, tall, slim, erect, of dark complexion, a singer, and a born leader and organizer of men.” William Hoyt Fancher, The Fancher Family, ed. William Carroll Hill (Milford, NH: Cabinet Press, 1947), 95–96; Burr Fancher, Captain Alexander Fancher: Adventurer, Drover, Wagon Master and Victim of the Mountain Meadows Massacre (Portland: Inkwater Press, 2006), xvi & 46.

30 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Fancher to Wilson, August 2, 1885, Wilson to Dunn, March 13, 1885, in Dunn Collection; Hill, Fancher Family, 96; Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 41; “Marker Placed at Fancher Grave Site,” Harrison Daily Times (Arkansas), September 11, 2007; Annie Elizabeth Hoag, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:29; Arkansas, Carroll County, Osage Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, handwritten p. 201. Two and a half weeks after the massacre, Wilford Woodruff recorded in his journal that John D. Lee reported to Brigham Young he had two of the surviving children, one boy and one girl. Wilford Woodruff, Journal, September 29, 1857, LDS Church History Library. Mary Campbell claimed that John D. Lee had two of the surviving children. Andrew Jenson, notes of discussion with Mary S. Campbell, January 24, 1892, Mountain Meadows file, Jenson Collection; Andrew Jenson, interview with Mary S. Campbell, January 24, 1892, Jenson Interviews; Harmony Branch, Minutes, November 1, 1857, Huntington Library. During the time of his incarceration, John D. Lee believed that one of his fellow prisoners, a man named Richard Sloan who went by the alias “Idaho Bill,” was the boy he remembered as “Charley Fancher.” Although Sloan gave what was believed to be an eye-witness account from one of the surviving children, it was a fraud since the real Christopher “Kit” Carson Fancher died before the Sloan accounts were published. James C. Wilson, the husband of Kit Carson Fancher’s sister Triphenia wrote to verify that Richard Sloan was an imposter. John D. Lee to J. W. or Mary Baxter, November 10, 1876, HM 31207, John D. Lee, Collection, Huntington Library; John D. Lee to J. W. Baxter, January 21, 1877, HM 31206, Lee Collection; “I Survived the Massacre,” Salt Lake Tribune, October 31, 1875; “’Idaho Bill’: His Story of the Massacre at Mountain Meadows,” Daily Morning Call (San Francisco), May 29, 1877; James C. Wilson to Jacob P. Dunn, May 11, 1885, Dunn Collection.

31 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Wilson to Dunn, March 13, 1885, in Dunn Collection; “‘Children of the Massacre’”; Hill, Fancher Family, 96; Family group sheet, Carroll County Historical Society, Berryville, Arkansas; Arkansas, Carroll County, Osage Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, handwritten p. 201. She later claimed to have been given the name Annie while residing with the Mormons. Fancher to Wilson, August 2, 1885, Wilson to Dunn, March 13, 1885, in Dunn Collection.

32 Hill, Fancher Family, 53; Arkansas Tax records, 1821–84, Carroll County taxes for 1856, p. D-426, film no. 1954591, LDS Family History Library; Fancher, Captain Alexander Fancher, 94; Arkansas, Carroll County, Carrollton Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 128. Both James Fancher and his wife Frances “Fanny” Fancher are notably absent from the 1860 and subsequent census records. “James Mathew, b. in 1832; killed in Mountain Meadow Massacre with his brother Robert and cousin Capt. Alexander Fancher.” Hill, Fancher Family, 53. According to a family tradition, after Alexander Fancher was killed in the early attacks, leadership of the wagon company was passed to his cousin James Mathew Fancher. Fancher, Captain Alexander Fancher, 110; Will Bagley, Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2002), 145.

33 According to a family tradition published in Fancher, Captain Alexander Fancher, 94, Matt had become “entangled with a young lady named Fanny Fulfer. California seemed to be a safe distance from impending fatherhood.” Thus, according to that branch of the Fancher family, James Matthew Fancher and Fanny Fulfer were not married previous to the journey west and she did not accompany him.

34 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Hill, Fancher Family, 53; Arkansas, Carroll County, Carrollton Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 128.

35 According to John Gibson, ed., History of York County, Pennsylvania (Chicago: F. A. Battey Publishing, 1886), part II, 20, Henry J. Gresly “had a brother killed in the Mountain Meadow massacre in Utah.” John Gresly was the most likely candidate of Henry Gresly’s brothers. According to an entry for John “Gressley,” York County, Pennsylvania, Court of Quarter Sessions, Dockets, Book G, April Session, 1851, pp. 137, 141, he was indicted for “malicious mischief”; Pennsylvania, York County, North Ward, York Borough, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 2.

36 Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 13, 32; Bishop, Mormonism Unveiled, 238–39. The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (Thomas?) Hamilton listed under “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

37 Benton County, AR, Deed records, 1837-56, vol. D, 169, film no. 1034925, LDS Family History Library; “Lee’s Victims,” San Francisco Chronicle,March 23, 1877, also reprinted in “The Slaughtered Emigrants,” Daily Memphis Avalanche, March 31, 1877; “Public Meeting of the People of Carroll County”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; “Statement of Mrs. G. D. Cates”; “A Survivor of the Mountain Meadow Massacre,” Fort Smith Weekly New Era, February 24, 1875; Missouri, Dallas County, Dist. 26, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 347B. The Harrison monument identifies the children of Peter Huff and his wife as Angeline, Annie, and Ephraim W., yet there seems to be no other record that those were the names of the Huff children.

38 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton,Report of the Massacre, 32; “Statement of Mrs. G. D. Cates”; “Survivor of the Mountain Meadow Massacre”; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Thomas T. Willis, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:34; Arkansas, Yell County, Delaware Township, 1870 U.S. Census, population schedule, 547; Shirley Pyron, “Grave Found of Massacre Survivor,” Carroll County Historical Quarterly 52, no. 1 (March 2007): 6–10.

39 In the article “The Mountain Meadow Massacre: Statement of One of the Few Survivors,” Daily Arkansas Gazette, September 1, 1875, Nancy Sophrona Huff stated that she “had a sister . . . and four brothers that they killed.” The 1990 monument at Mountain Meadows and the 1999 memorial service program identified William Huff, Elisha Huff, and two other sons as victims of the massacre. The 1850 census records for the Huff family possibly identify the two other sons as John and James. See Missouri, Dallas County, Dist. 26, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 347B. There is no known record of an Elisha Huff or a fourth Huff son, who is mentioned on the Mountain Meadows monument and in the 1999 memorial service program; however, there could have been an Elisha Huff. It should also be noted that one of the surviving children, Felix Marion Jones, was earlier identified as Elisha W. Huff. See J. Forney to C. E. Mix, May 4, 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 58. Later on, Forney refers to him as Ephraim W. Huff. J. Forney to A. B. Greenwood, August 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 79.

40 “Public Meeting”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Francis M. Rowan, Fielding Wilburn, and Felix W. Jones, depositions, October 24, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; P., October 29, 1857, in “Letter from Angel’s Camp”; Arkansas, Johnson County, Spadra Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 161B.

41 The 1990 monument at Mountain Meadows and the 1999 memorial service program claim that the Jones child who died in the massacre was a daughter.

42 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Forney to Mix, May 4, 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 58; Forney to Greenwood, August 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 79; “F. M. Jones Died Tuesday Afternoon,” Lampasas (TX) Record, June 2, 1932; “Selected Families and Individuals,” Rootsweb, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~shill957/pafg3944.htm (accessed July 21, 2008).

43 Francis M. Rowan, Fielding Wilburn, and Felix W. Jones, depositions, October 24, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; “Public Meeting”; Arkansas, Marion County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 328B.

44 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Vicki A. Roberts and Mysty T. McPherson, Genealogies of Marion County Families, 1811-1900 (Yellville, AR: Historica Genealogical Society of Marion County Arkansas, 1997), 269; A Reminiscent History of the Ozark Region (Chicago: Goodspeed, 1894), 328; Floydene Sanders Gillihan, Moody, Tippit, McEntire, Patton, Milam (n.p., [1999]), 8; Arkansas, Marion County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 327. Lawson McEntire is likely the Lawson Mitchell identified on the 1955 Harrison, Arkansas monument. Ironically, his older brother, John, had traveled through Salt Lake City several years earlier. John was suffering from tuberculosis when he arrived and was nursed by the Mormons until he died. Gillihan, Moody, Tippit, McEntire, Patton, Milam, 8; Reminiscent History of the Ozark Region, 328; Genealogies of Marion County Families, 269.

45 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Thurston, affidavit, October 15, 1877; Thurston, deposition, May 2, 1911, Malinda Thurston v. The United States and Ute Indian; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Arkansas, Crawford County, Mountain Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 329; Sandra K. Ogle, The Miller Family in California: Being a History of Felix Grundy Miller, 1814–1892, and His Wife, Susanna Matilda Cisco, 1816–1875 (Baltimore: Gateway Press; Napa, CA: S. K. Ogle, 1985), 16–19. The Malinda Cameron Thurston’s depositions identified her brother-in-law’s name as Joseph or Joe Miller, but census and other records indicate his name was Josiah. The Harrison monument indicates that three children of Josiah Miller and his wife were killed at the massacre but does not give their names. Most sources indicate that the Millers had only four children, despite Lt. Kearny’s statement that John Calvin had two brothers, Henry and James, and three sisters, Nancy, Mary, and Martha. See Kearny, “List of the Children Saved.”

46 Alexander Wilson to Jacob Forney, June 27, 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 64; Editorial, Salt Lake City Valley Tan, June 29, 1859; Forney to Greenwood, August 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 79; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Annie Elizabeth Hoag, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:29–30; Utah and the Mormons: Speech of Hon. John Cradlebaugh, of Nevada, on the Admission of Utah as a State (Washington, D.C.: L. Towers, 1863), 20; Harmony Branch, Minutes, November 1, 1857; Arkansas, Carroll County, Carrollton, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, handwritten 722; “‘Children of the Massacre’ May Meet in Reunion”; J. Forney to A. B. Greenwood, November 2, 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 91; A. B. Greenwood to J. Forney, November 30, 1859, telegraph, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 92; A. B. Greenwood to William C. Mitchell, December 12, 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 99. Malinda Cameron Scott Thurston’s affidavit of October 15, 1877 claimed that one of the Miller children who survived the massacre was named Alfred. It appears Malinda Thurston was likely referring to John Calvin Miller.

47 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Arkansas, Yell County, Galley Rock Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, handwritten 38. Haight family tradition claims that one of the surviving children was taken to the Haight’s home in Cedar City. The family called the child “Ann Marie” and described her as being “fair with yellow hair and blue eyes.” Many years later one of Isaac C. Haight’s grandsons, Isaac Perry met this now grown woman while he served a Church mission in Tennessee. If this story is true, than Mary Miller is the most likely child to be known as “Ann Marie.” “Mary Ann and Ann Marie,” Caroline Parry Woolley, Collection, Special Collections, Gerald R. Sherratt Library, Southern Utah University, Cedar City. Mary Miller may have been the girl blessed in February 1858 and given the name Lucy Kate Morris. Cedar City Stake, Record of Children Blessed.

48 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Wm. H. Rogers, “The Mountain Me[a]dows Massacre,” Valley Tan, February 29, 1860; Philip Klingensmith, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 3:89; Annie Elizabeth Hoag, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:29; Andrew Jenson, notes of discussion with Mary S. Campbell, January 24, 1892, Mountain Meadows file, Jenson Collection; Andrew Jenson, interview with Mary S. Campbell, January 24, 1892, Jenson Interviews; Harmony Branch, Minutes, November 1, 1857; Arkansas, Mississippi County, Chickasawba Township, 1870 U.S. Census, population schedule, 538B; Stanislaus County, California vital records, Certificate of Death for William Tillman Miller, May 10, 1940; “Last Survivor of Massacre is Called by Death,” Modesto Bee, May 10, 1940; Nancy Malejko, e-mail to Sidney Price, August 29, 2003. Young Joseph Miller was identified as Josiah Miller in Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs.

49 “Public Meeting of the People of Carroll County”; “Extract from a Letter to the Editor, Dated Carroll Co., Jan. 5, 1858”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; William C. Mitchell to William K. Sebastian, December 31, 1857, as quoted in Logan, “Mountain Meadows Massacre,” 31; William C. Mitchell and Samuel Mitchell, depositions regarding the property of Charles R. and Joel Mitchell, October 22, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; P., October 29, 1857, in “Letter from Angel’s Camp”; Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships”; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 162B, 163B.

50 “Public Meeting of the People of Carroll County”; “Extract from a Letter to the Editor, Dated Carroll Co., Jan. 5, 1858”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Sebastian, December 31, 1857, as quoted in Logan, “Mountain Meadows Massacre,” 31; William C. Mitchell and Samuel Mitchell, depositions, October 22, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; P., October 29, 1857, in “Letter from Angel’s Camp”; Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships”; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 162B.

51 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Arkansas, Marion County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 325.

52 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Arkansas, Marion County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 325.

53 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Lorenzo D. Rush and Hugh A. Torrance, depositions regarding the property of Milam Rush, October 23, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; Arkansas, Carroll County, Carrollton Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 126B; Arkansas, Carroll County, Carrollton Township, 1870 U.S. Census, population schedule, 419.

54 “Public Meeting”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Francis M. Rowan and Fielding Wilburn, depositions, October 24, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; Parker, Recollections of the Massacre, 5; P., October 29, 1857, in “Letter from Angel’s Camp”; Arkansas, Johnson County, Spadra Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 161B (Sebron Tackitt appeared as Sebbyrn Tackitt in the 1850 census). Although modern memorials of the massacre use the name “Cynthia Tackitt,” original records from the 1850s refer to her as “Cyntha” or “Cintha.” The Harrison monument indicates that three children of “Cintha Tackett” were killed at the massacre but does not give their names. A total of eight Tackitt children possibly traveled with the Baker-Fancher Company. Two of those children, Pleasant Tackitt and Eloah Tackitt Jones, were married and are identified with their own families.

55 “Public Meeting of the People of Carroll County”; Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Francis M. Rowan and Fielding Wilburn, depositions, October 24, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; Arkansas, Johnson County, Spadra Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 161B.The Harrison monument indicates that two children of Pleasant Tackitt and his wife were victims of the massacre. However, the only known children of Pleasant and Armilda Tackitt were Emberson Milum and William Henry, who survived the killing and returned to Arkansas.

56 Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships”; Ogle, Miller Family in California, 16–19.

57 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; Philip Klingensmith, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 3:89; Thomas T. Willis, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:34; “‘Children of the Massacre’ May Meet in Reunion”; J. Forney to A. B. Greenwood, November 2, 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 91; A. B. Greenwood to J. Forney, November 30, 1859, telegraph, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 92; A. B. Greenwood to William C. Mitchell, December 12, 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 99; Arkansas, Carroll County, Osage Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 866; Barbara Baldwin Salyer, comp., Arizona 1890 Great Registers (Mesa, Ariz.: Arizona Genealogical Advisory Board, 2001), 318; Arizona, Coconino County, Williams Precinct, 1910 U.S. Census, population schedule, ED 22, sheet 13A; “Popular Pioneer Is Laid to Rest,” Prescott Journal Miner, June 15, 1912, typescript of article located at http://files.usgwarchives.org/ar/carroll/obits/t2300001.txt (accessed July 21, 2008). John W. Bradshaw implied that John M. Higbee had two of the surviving children, while only Emberson Milum Tackitt was recovered from his home. John W. Bradshaw, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Boreman Transcript, 4:80–81. The Harrison monument named an “Ambrose Tackett” as a victim of the massacre, which is probably a mistaken name for Emberson Milum Tackitt who survived. He is identified as Miram Tackett in Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs.

58 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Mitchell to Conway, October 11, 1860, in Carleton, Report of the Massacre, 32; Kearny, “List of the Children Saved”; “‘Children of the Massacre’ May Meet in Reunion”; Cedar City Stake, Record of Children Blessed; Arkansas, Carroll County, Osage Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 866; “Mountain Meadows Survivor’s Buried in Protem, MO, Cemetery,” Ozarks Mountaineer (February 1975): 11; Missouri, Taney County, Big Creek Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, ED 125, 283B.

59 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Arkansas, Marion County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 323B; Margaret A. Butler, “Mountain Meadows Massacre Discussion,” http://www.rootsweb.com/~armarion/marioncoinfo/MMM.html (accessed April 4, 2007); Margaret Butler to Craig L. Foster, January 18, 21, 2004, email; Arkansas, Marion County, Union Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 539; Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships.”

60 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Roberts and McPherson, Genealogies of Marion County Families, 469; Earl Berry, History of Marion County (Little Rock, AR: Marion County Historical Association, 1977), 273; Arkansas, Marion County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 320B. Solomon and William’s first cousin, William “Prairie Bill” Coker married Alexander Fancher’s first cousin, Arminta Fancher, thus making them distantly related by marriage.

61 Mitchell to Greenwood, April 27, 1860, in Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Roberts and McPherson, Genealogies of Marion County Families, 469; Berry, History of Marion County, 273; Arkansas, Marion County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 320B.

62 Jacob Hamblin, who re-interred the remains of those killed at Mountain Meadows the following spring, counted the remains of about 120 bodies, leaving about thirty victims unknown and unnamed. Jacob Hamblin, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, Second Trial, Boreman Transcript, 1:86. The 1990 monument at the Mountain Meadows and the 1999 Memorial Service program indicate that one survivor of the massacre remained in Utah. Some recent accounts identified that child as Priscilla Klingensmith Urie, a daughter of massacre participant Philip Klingensmith. See Anna Jean Backus, Through Bonds of Love: In The Shadow of the Mountain Meadows Massacre (Orem, Utah: AJB Distributing, 1998); Brooks, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 104–5. However, recent DNA analysis of the descendants of Priscilla Klingensmith Urie have concluded that she was the biological daughter of Philip Klingensmith and his wife Betsy Cattle and not a member of the Baker-Fancher company. Ugo A. Perego and Scott R. Woodward, “Mountain Meadows Survivor? A Mitochondrial DNA Examination” Journal of Mormon History 32, no. 3 (Fall 2006): 45–53. Currently there is no extant evidence to suggest that any of the surviving children of the Mountain Meadows Massacre remained in Utah.

Part II: Those Who Separated from the Baker and Fancher Companies before the Mountain Meadows Massacre

Most individuals and families in this section traveled with the Baker and Fancher companies, but then separated from them before or at Salt Lake City and took the northern route to California.

The lists are arranged alphabetically by family name and then by age within each immediate family group. Children’s names are indented after the names of their parents. Listed after each name is the person’s age at the time of the massacre. Ages are approximated from federal census records and other available family history resources. Letters at the end of each entry indicate which individuals were memorialized as victims of the massacre on monuments in Harrison, Arkansas, and at Mountain Meadows, as well as in a program published for the 1999 memorial service at Mountain Meadows. H designates the Harrison, Arkansas, monument, dedicated in November 1955; M the Mountain Meadows monument, dedicated September 15, 1990; and MS the program for the memorial service held when some of the victims’ remains were re-interred at Mountain Meadows on September 10, 1999.

Boen, James Frederick, 26. Brother of William Boen and Mahala Boen Callahan. Upon reaching California, he settled in San Joaquin County and then in Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties.1
Boen, Nancy Holt, 27.
Martha, 4.
George W., 1.
Boen, William Carroll, 28. Brother of James Frederick Boen and Mahala Boen Callahan.2
Boen, Nancy Harp, 25. Sister of William Bohannon and Thomas David Harp, and sister-in-law of Francis Marion Poteet, by his first wife.
Sarah E., 10.
Martha J., 8.
Mary E., 6.
William C., 5.
Malinda E., 3.
Callahan, Stephen W., 37. The Callahans left from Newton County, Arkansas, and settled first in San Joaquin County, California.3
Callahan, Mahala Boen, 32. Sister of William Carroll Bowen and James Frederick Boen.
Martha, 11.
Andrew J., 8.
Stephen, 5.
Mary J., 2.
Campbell, Peter Calmus, 19. Uncle of Peter Henry Campbell and future brother-in-law of Alf Smith.4
Campbell, Peter Henry, 31. Nephew of Peter Calmus Campbell.5
Campbell, Catherine Hefley, 24.
Nancy Ann, 4.
Lucinda Ellen, 3.
Richard C., 2.
Cecil, Joseph, 35. Son of Sarah “Sally” Cecil. He and his family were members of the Basil Parker company, which took the main trail into northern California. The Cecils eventually settled in Tulare County.6
Cecil, Mary Houston, 28.
George, 10.
Margaret, 8.
Sarah, 5.
Nancy, 3.
Angeline, 1.
Cecil, Sarah “Sally” Hatfield, 53. Born in Kentucky, she was the widow of Benjamin S. Cecil. She and her family were members of the Basil Parker company and eventually settled in Tulare County, California.7
James, 25.8
Samuel, 20.
Granville, 18.
Cecil, William, 22. Son of Sarah “Sally” Cecil. His family joined the Basil Parker company and settled in Tulare County, California.9
Cecil, Ellen, 19.
Mary, infant. She was born near Fort Bridger. Her birth delayed the Parker company and factored into their decision to take the main California trail rather than catch up to and continue with the Baker and Fancher companies.10
Chrisman, Gabriel, 24. Brother of Henry Tyler Chrisman and related by marriage to the Cecils. He was a member of the Basil Parker company and was a cattle drover during the journey west.11
Chrisman, Henry Tyler, 27. Brother of Gabriel Chrisman and related by marriage to the Cecils. He was a member of the Basil Parker company. In 1860 he married Elizabeth Parker, niece of Basil Parker.12
Duck, William B., 23. From Stark County, Ohio, the Ducks were married a few months before they went west. Duck led a company from Ohio and other north-central states that included Paxton Jacoby, Ephraim Matthias, and Joseph Ware. They separated from the Baker and Fancher companies at Fort Bridger. Their separation apparently resulted from an argument with the Arkansas emigrants over slavery. They settled in Marysville, Yuba County, California, where William worked as a confectioner.13
Duck, Rebecca Jacoby, 19. Sister of Paxton Jacoby.
Dunn, Squire, 48. Born in Tenessee, he later settled in Arkansas. He was married first to Sarah Henderson and later to Mathilda Kelly. He was a member of the Basil Parker company.14
Dunn, Mathilda Kelly, 37. Widow of Anderson Parker, who was a brother of Basil Parker. Squire Dunn was her second husband, and their large, combined family traveled with them to California. Mathilda was a sister of Malinda Kelly Parker, Greenberry Kelly, Hezekiah Kelly, and Samuel Kelly.
Ishom Johnson, 20.
Clarinda F., 19.
Claiborn T., 18.
Nancy Clark, 16.
Sophia A., 15.
Sarah, 14.
Elizabeth Malinda Parker, 13. Daughter of Anderson Parker and Malinda Kelly. She married Henry Tyler Chrisman in 1860.15
William Jasper, 13.
James Wilson, 12.
John Lockward, 11.
Nancy Caroline Parker, 11. Daughter of Anderson Parker and Malinda Kelly.
Susanna, 9.
Mahala Adeline, 7.
Samuel A., 1.
Farmer, Tom, adult, age unknown. He probably took the main trail north after Salt Lake City. He returned with Peter Calmus Campbell and Alf Smith to Newton County, Arkansas, in 1859.16 M,MS
Harp, Thomas David, 32. Brother of Nancy Harp Boen and William Bohannon Harp, and brother-in-law to Francis Marion Poteet. He had experience crossing the plains in 1850. In 1857 Thomas left Newton County, Arkansas, and led a group of other close family members, including the Boens, Callahans, and possibly the Poteets. Although the Harp company was considered a separate group, they traveled near the Baker and Fancher companies before separating in Salt Lake City. The Harps went north out of Salt Lake to take the main California trail, where along the Humboldt River they incurred trouble with Indians in the area, who stole some of their cattle. Thomas eventually settled in San Joaquin County, California, and served in the California State Senate between 1891 and 1893.17
Harp, Elizabeth Henderson, 21.
James David, 11.
William Bachner, 10
Martha A., 8.
Sarah Catherine, 3.
Harp, William Bohannon, 38. Brother of Nancy Harp Boen and Thomas David Harp and brother-in-law of Francis Marion Poteet.18
Harp, Malinda T. Grace, 38.
Sarah Jane, 13.
Salina Amelia, 10.
William Bohannon Jr., 6.
James Anderson, 4.
Permelia, 1.
Hudson, William Carroll, 22. Member of the Basil Parker company.19
Hudson, Mary Jane Dunn, 22. Daughter of Squire Dunn and his first wife, Sarah C. Henderson.
Ruben, 1.
Jacoby, Paxton King, 21. Brother of Rebecca Jacoby Duck. In California he became a miner in Nevada County and then served a number of years as a San Francisco policeman. He later moved to Los Angeles.20
Kelly, Greenberry Marion, 22. Brother of Hezekiah Kelly, Samuel Kelly, Mathilda Kelly Dunn, and Malinda Kelly Parker. Joined the Basil Parker company and settled in Tulare County, California.21
Kelly, Sarah Jane Henderson, 17.
Nancy E., 1.
Kelly, Hezekiah Monroe, 34. Brother of Greenberry Kelly, Samuel Kelly, Mathilda Kelly Dunn, and Malinda Kelly Parker. Joined the Basil Parker company and settled in Tulare County, California.22
Kelly, Nancy Cecil, 25. Daughter of Sarah “Sally” Cecil.
Anderson, 7.
Paralee Jane, 5.
Jeptha M., 4.
William, 1.
Kelly, Samuel Williamson, 31. Brother of Greenberry Kelly, Hezekiah Kelly, Mathilda Kelly Dunn, and Malinda Kelly Parker. Joined the Basil Parker company and settled in Tulare County, California.23
Kelly, Celethia Hudson, 27.
Samuel Anderson, 1.
Kelly, Thomas, 15. Nephew of Greenberry Kelly, Hezekiah Kelly, Samuel Kelly, Mathilda Kelly Dunn, and Malinda Kelly Parker. Joined the Basil Parker company and settled in Tulare County, California.24
Kelsey, Eli B., 37. A Mormon who traveled with the train between Ft. Bridger and Salt Lake City.25
King, Francis Eaton, 22. He and his wife joined at least some of the ill-fated emigrants at Pacific Springs near South Pass in modern-day Wyoming. He separated from the train at Emigration Canyon just outside Salt Lake City. The Kings would later become Mormons and eventually settle in Marysvale, Piute County, Utah. He was called as a witness in John D. Lee’s first trial. He later gave information to Josiah Gibbs for his account of the massacre.26
King, Marcia Frances Bessey, 19.
Louisa, 1.
Matthias, Ephraim, age unknown. Reportedly traveled in the same company as William B. Duck and Paxton Jacoby and eventually settled in Nevada.27
Martin, Samuel Lewis, 24. A biographical sketch of Martin noted, “On March 22, 1857, he started for the Golden West . . . After traveling a few days he overtook a large train westward bound and joined them, doing his share of the work in driving stock . . . here he met his future wife, Miss Ala Scott . . . As soon as they reached California [they] were married, in October, 1857. Some members of the train decided to choose the well-beaten trails, while others who were over anxious to reach California, took a shorter route and were murdered in the Mountain Meadow massacre.”28
Middleton, Wesley, age unknown. Member of the Basil Parker company. Died of mountain fever between Fort Bridger and Salt Lake City.29
Osborne, George, 32. From Fulton County, Arkansas, the Osbornes separated from the Arkansas emigrants at Salt Lake City and took the northern trail. George eventually became a miner and then a teamster in Calaveras County, California.30
Osborne, Rebecca Emma Cates, 29.
Samuel, 6. Later in life Samuel was the first in the family to attempt ranching.
John, 4.
William David, 2.
Page, John Robert, 39. The Pages left from Madison County, Arkansas; separated from the Arkansas emigrants at Salt Lake City; and settled in El Dorado County, California.31
Page, Frances Ralston, 34.
Elizabeth Emley, 15.
Clarissa Jane, 14.
James K., 12.
Moses Caleb, 9.
John Robert, 7.
Lewis Johnson, 5.
Sarah Frances, 4.
Samuel M., 2.
Henry Towel, infant.
Parker, Alvin, 64. Father of Basil Parker. He settled along the Buffalo River in northwest Arkansas in 1835 and later settled with his son in Tulare County, California.32
Parker, Basil Gaither, 31. Son of Alvin Parker. He first traveled to California in 1853. In the spring of 1857, he organized a group of his family and friends at Arkansas to settle in California. His group traveled in tandem with the train organized by John T. Baker before they fell behind at Fort Bridger. Parker took the main road into northern California and settled in Tulare County.33
Parker, Malinda Kelly, 32. Sister of Greenberry Kelly, Hezekiah Kelly, Samuel Kelly, and Mathilda Kelly Dunn.
Nancy, 10.
Elizabeth Matilda, 9.
Parker, Elmira Cecil, 28. Daughter of Sarah “Sally” Cecil, widow of William Hiram Parker, and sister-in-law of Basil Parker. She was a member of the Basil Parker company.34
Joseph Anderson, 8.
George Alvah, 7.
Benjamin Basil, 3.
Perry, Peter R., 24. The son of Samuel B. Perry and Elizabeth Cooper, he settled in Fresno County.35
Perry, Amanda Lowery, 18.
Perry, Samuel Baker, 48. Both Samuel and his wife and one of their children were born in North Carolina. The family also lived in Tennessee, Missouri, and Newton County, Arkansas, before going to California and settling in Fresno County.36
Perry, Elizabeth Cooper, 47.
Edward N., 22.
James Abner, 20.
Samuel Richard, 18.
Elizabeth Perilee, 14.
Elijah George, 11.
Amanda A., 6.
Virginia Caroline, 3.
Poteet, Francis Marion, 24. Family legend maintains that Poteet and his family escaped the train just before the massacre. The 1860 U.S. Census places them in Los Angeles. Given his close ties to the Harp family, however, he may instead have continued to California in Thomas D. Harp’s train, which traveled close to the Baker train as far as Salt Lake City. In 1850 Poteet married Salina A. Harp, sister of Thomas D. Harp. After Salina’s death in 1852, he married Thomas D. Harp’s niece, Mary Ann “Polly” Davis. He and other members of the Poteet family eventually settled in Texas.37 M,MS
Poteet, Mary Ann Davis, 22.
Matilda Melissa, 4.
Sarah Elizabeth, 2.
Washington Reed, 1.
Jasper Newton, infant. Born in Utah Territory en route to California.38
Poteet Brothers. Family historian Douglas McEuen claimed that Anderson J. and James Samuel Poteet traveled to California with their brother, Francis Marion Poteet. Anderson possibly traveled with his brother since he eventually settled in Tuolumne County, California. James, however, likely did not go west in 1857, since he was only about fifteen years old and in 1860 was still living with his parents at Piney Township, Johnson County, Arkansas.39 M
Scott, Allie (Ala), 22. Sister of Henry Dalton and Richard Thomas Scott. After she reached California, she married Samuel L. Martin.40
Scott, Henry Dalton, 26. Brother of Richard Scott and Allie Scott Martin. Was killed by someone in his own party after leaving Salt Lake City on the northern road.41
Scott, Malinda Cameron, 28. Daughter of William and Martha Cameron.
Joel, 6.
Martha, 4.
George, 2.
Susan, infant. Born en route to California.42
Scott, Richard Thomas, 20. Brother of Henry Scott and Allie Scott Martin.43
Scott, Susan, 19.
Malinda, 2.
Smith, Alfred, 23. Brother-in-law of Peter Calmus Campbell.44 M
Stallcup, Charles, 25. Brother-in-law of William and Solomon Wood, who were killed at Mountain Meadows, and related by marriage to James Larramore. Several sources list Stallcup as a victim of the Massacre. In fact he actually reached California but did not return to his wife and family in Arkansas. This was probably because of an earlier fight he was involved in that ended in the death of his friend and neighbor George Coker by the hand of Jake Nave. Instead Stallcup went to his mother’s home in Missouri, where he remarried. He served in the Confederate infantry during the Civil War and later lived in Texas and the Indian Territory.45 M,MS
Turrentine, Thomas, 16. A neighbor of the Dunlaps in Johnson County, Arkansas, he traveled with Thomas Harp’s company. On the headwaters of the Humboldt, he was shot in the thigh during a fight with Indians over stolen cattle. Though he made it to California, he remained a cripple for the rest of his life.46
Ware, Joseph, age unknown. Reportedly traveled in the same company as William B. Duck and Paxton Jacoby and eventually settled somewhere in California.47
Warren, Nat, age unknown. Went to California with the Basil Parker company.48
Wasson, Abner Washington, 37. Although the Wasson family started west from Carroll County, Arkansas, they did not make it out of the state. They settled in Washington County after stopping to assist a friend and fellow traveler who had broken his leg in an accident.49
Wasson, Hannah Trotter, 32.
Artamissa Elizabeth, 12.
Josiah Hodge, 10.
William David, 7.
Alfred W., 5.
Richard “Dick” Parley, 4.
James Franklin, 2.

Notes

1 Edith Frances Nichols, “The Bowens,” n. d., typescript, family history, copy obtained from Janel Prince a granddaughter of Edith Francis Nichols; Janel Prince to Craig L. Foster, October 15, 25, 27, 2005, email; Arkansas, Newton County, Jackson Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 11B; California, San Joaquin County, Castoria Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 894.

2 “In March of 1857, Fred Bowen, his brother Carol, and sister Mahala Callahan and families decided to join a caravan of eighty-three wagons drawn by oxen to California. The leader of the train was a man by the name of Fancher.” Nichols, “Bowens”; Prince to Foster, October 15, 25, 27, 2005, email; Arkansas, Newton County, Jackson Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 11B; California, San Joaquin County, Castoria Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 892–93; Bill Jones, “Casbeer Jones Family Research,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=casbeerjones&id=I38320 (accessed June 19, 2008).

3 Nichols, “Bowens”; Arkansas, Newton County, Jackson Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 11; California, San Joaquin County, Castoria Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 894.

4 David Collins, “He Traveled with the Mountain Meadows Wagon Train,” in Newton County Family History (Jasper, AR: Newton County Historical Society, 1992), 38; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 159B; Carri L. Holt, “My Family,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cuzncarri&id=I03471 (accessed August 4, 2008). Peter Calmus Campbell is the son of Peter Henry’s grandfather through a second marriage. Pedigree chart for Peter Calmus Campbell found at Carri L. Holt, “My Family,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=cuzncarri&id=I03471 (accessed June 19, 2008); Pedigree chart for Peter Henry Campbell found at Carri L. Holt, “My Family,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=cuzncarri&id=I04003 (accessed June 19, 2008).

5 Ruth Peterson, comp., Across the Plains in ’57: The Story of the Family of Peter Campbell and a Train of Immigrants As Told by Nancy Campbell Lowell, a Member of the Party, pamphlet, June 1936, conveniently published in Carroll County Historical Quarterly 43 (June 1998): 60–62; Arkansas, Carroll County, Jefferson Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 165. Peter Henry Campbell died February 25, 1868 in Sylvan Corners, Sacramento County, California. He is buried at the nearby Sylvan Cemetery. Carri L. Holt, “My Family,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=cuzncarri&id=I04003 (accessed June 19, 2008).

6 A Reminiscent History of the Ozark Region (Chicago: Goodspeed, 1894), 323; Shirley McFadzean and Ruth Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California,” undated manuscript, copy located in Mountain Meadows Massacre Research Files, LDS Church History Library; Arkansas, Newton County, Jackson Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 10; “Former Visalian Dies in Stockton,” Visalia Morning Delta, April 4, 1911; California, Tulare County, Township 1, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 88. He and other members of his family were distantly related by marriage to the Harps.

7 Reminiscent History of the Ozark Region, 323; McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; Arkansas, Newton County, Van Buren Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 19; California, Tulare County, Township 1, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 88; California, Tulare County, Visalia, 1870 U.S. Census, population schedule, 289.

8 Basil G. Parker, The Life and Adventures of Basil G. Parker, An Autobiography (Plano, CA: Fred W. Reed, 1902), 61.

9 Parker, Life and Adventures, 61–62; “Aunt Ellen Cecil Passes to Beyond,” Visalia Morning Delta, October 14, 1914; Reminiscent History of the Ozark Region, 323; McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; Arkansas, Newton County, Van Buren Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 19; California, Tulare County, Township 1, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 108.

10 Parker, Life and Adventures, 61–62.

11 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Township 2, 1860 census, population schedule, 20; Annie R. Mitchell, “Chrisman Family History Covers Entire Span of History of County,” Visalia Times-Delta, February 10, 1951; Tiffany Breen, “The Chrisman Family,” Visalia Lifestyle Magazine (February 2005): 46, 48; California, Tulare County, E.D. 62, 1900 U.S. Census, population schedule, 13A; Joan, “Lee’s Ancestors and Descendants,” Rootsweb’s Worldconnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=leecase&id=I23930 (accessed August 4, 2008).

12 Parker, Life and Adventures, 81; McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Township 2, 1860 census, population schedule, 20; Mitchell, “Chrisman Family History”; Breen, “Chrisman Family,” 46, 48; Joan, “Lee’s Ancestors and Descendants,” Rootsweb’s Worldconnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=leecase&id=I23930 (accessed August 4, 2008).

13 “Lee’s Victims,” San Francisco Chronicle, March 23, 1877; Early Marriages of Stark County, Ohio (Alliance, OH: Alliance Genealogical Society, 1995), 3:65; Ohio, Stark County, Perry Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 222B (Rebecca Jacoby Duck only); California, Yuba County, 1st Ward, Marysville, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 846.

14 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Township 1, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 86–87; “Died–Dunn,” Visalia Weekly Delta, January 23, 1890; Jeff Edwards, 100 Year History of the Tule River Mountain Country (Fresno, CA: Panorama West Books, 1986), 216–17. Seven-year-old daughter Mahala’s name is listed as Mahalila in Edwards, 100 Year History, 216-17.

15 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; Mitchell, “Chrisman Family History”; California, Tulare County, Township 2, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 20.

16 Collins, “Mountain Meadows Wagon Train,” 38. The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (Tom?) Farmer with “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

17 Parker, Life and Adventures, 21, 65–67; Nichols, “Bowens”; Arkansas, Johnson County, Spadra Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 156; California, Stanislaus County, Turlock Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 305B; J. Carlyle Parker, ed., Memorial and Biographical History of Merced, Stanislaus, Calaveras, Tuolomne and Mariposa Counties, California (1973), 198-99. Thomas D. Harp, and his family were living in San Joaquin County, California when his first wife Margaret Jane Kittrelle died on March 2, 1856. Thomas went back to Arkansas and was re-married to Elizabeth Henderson in January 1857. Shortly thereafter Thomas and his new bride returned to California with the Baker and Fancher wagon companies. It is unclear whether Thomas’s children James, William, Martha, and Sarah returned to Arkansas with their father or remained in California with other members of the Harp family who may have been living nearby. Dana Harp, “Descendant File,” RootsWeb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1783926&id=I07167 (accessed April 5, 2007); Dana Harp, “Descendant File,” RootsWeb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1783926&id=I07204 (accessed April 5, 2007). The 1857 Thomas D. Harp company apparently had more people than those listed in this appendix. When the Harp train had their cattle stolen from the Indians near the Humboldt headwaters thirty men pursued the Indians to recover the stock, four of whom were from Basil Parker’s train. Since Harp’s company had suffered the loss, one can assume most of the men sent to recover the stock were from his train, but their identities remain unknown. Helen Carpenter, “A Trip Across the Plains in an Ox Wagon, 1857,” in Sandra L. Myres, Ho for California! Women’s Overland Diaries from the Huntington Library (San Marino, CA: Huntington Library, 1980), 165–66; Parker, Life and Adventures, 65–66.

18 Nichols, “Bowens”; Arkansas, Johnson County, Horsehead Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 142B; California, Stanislaus County, Empire Township, 1870 U.S. Census, population schedule, 59; Dana Harp, “Descendant File,” RootsWeb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1783926&id=I07164 (accessed June 19, 2008); Bill Jones, “Casbeer Jones Family Research,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=casbeerjones&id=I38698 (accessed August 4, 2008). William B. Harp is identified as “Bill Hart” in Nichols, “Bowens.”

19 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Township 2, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 30; Edwards, 100 Year History of the Tule River Mountain Country, 211-17. Frank King named a Hudson as being with the Arkansas companies. It is possible that King remembered the name Hudson from the Basil Parker train. Josiah F. Gibbs, The Mountain Meadows Massacre (Salt Lake City: Salt Lake Tribune, 1910), 13. The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (David?) Hudson, listed under “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

20 “Lee’s Victims”; Ohio, Stark County, Perry Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 222B; California, Los Angeles County, County Farm, 1900 U.S. Census, population schedule, 336; “1867 Great Register Nevada County—MeadowLake/Donner Lake—1867” as accessed at http://webpages.cwia.com/~mficklin/greattop.html; San Francisco City Directory, 1875–80, film no. 1000843, LDS Family History Library.

21 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Township 1,1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 83; “Samuel Kelly Was Pioneer Settler in Visalia Area,” Visalia Times-Delta, October 31, 1952; Mickey Ratten, “American (Mostly) Trees, Roots, Twigs and Branches,” Rootsweb’s WorlConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ratten&id=I3969 (accessed June 20, 2008); Genealogical charts obtained from family files at the Sequoia Genealogical Society in Tulare, California.

22 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Township 1, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 90; Ratten, “American (Mostly) Trees, Roots, Twigs and Branches”; Genealogical charts obtained from family files at the Sequoia Genealogical Society in Tulare, California.

23 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Township 1, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 108; “Samuel Kelly Was Pioneer Settler”; Eugene L. Menefee and Fred A. Dodge, History of Tulare and Kings Counties, California: With Biographical Sketches of the Leading Men and Women of the Counties Who Have Been Identified with Their Growth and Development from the Early Days to the Present (Los Angeles: Historic Record, 1913), 408; Ratten, “American (Mostly) Trees, Roots, Twigs and Branches.” Sources vary on Samuel Kelly’s age.

24 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; Parker, Life and Adventures, 78, 81; California, Tulare County, Township 2, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 33.

25 C. F. McGlashan, “The Mountain Meadow Massacre,” Sacramento Daily Record, January 1, 1875; T. B. H. Stenhouse, The Rocky Mountain Saints: A Full and Complete History of the Mormons, from the First Vision of Joseph Smith to the Last Courtship of Brigham Young (New York: D. Appleton, 1873), 427–28; Fanny Stenhouse, Tell It All (Hartford, CT: A. D. Worthington, 1874), 325; Frank Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah (Salt Lake City: Utah Pioneers Book Publishing, 1913), 2:983.

26 Frank King, testimony, United States v. John D. Lee, First Trial, Jacob S. Boreman Transcript, bk. 4, pp. 116–17, Jacob S. Boreman Collection, Huntington Library, San Marino, CA; Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 12–13; Ancestral File v4.19; Utah, Sanpete County, Fort Ephraim, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, p. 633; Utah, Piute County, Marysvale Precinct, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 533D; Linda King Newell, “A Web of Trails: Bringing History Home,” Journal of Mormon History 24, no. 1 (Spring 1998): 14–27. According to LDS Ordinance Index (IGI Main file) v1.02, film no. 183404, Francis Eaton King was baptized a member of the LDS Church on November 5, 1857.

27 “Lee’s Victims.”

28 Ala Martin, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 19, 1877, 45th Congress, 2nd Session, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy of transcript in LDS Church History Library; Malinda Cameron Scott Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 1459, October 15, 1877, 45th Congress, 1st Session, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy of transcript in LDS Church History Library; Malinda Cameron Scott Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 18, 1877, 45th Congress, 2nd Session, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy of transcript in LDS Church History Library; Thurston, deposition, May 2, 1911, Malinda Thurston v. The United States and Ute Indian, U.S. Court of Claims, no. 8479, in Selected Documents Relating to the Mountain Meadows Massacre, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy at LDS Church History Library; California, San Joaquin County, Elkhorn Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 963; California, San Joaquin, Elliott Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 167D; Rick Short, “Short,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3084889&id=I2818 (accessed December 5, 2006); George H. Tinkham, ed., History of San Joaquin County, California: With Biographical Sketches of Leading Men and Women of the County Who Have Been Identified with Its Growth and Development from the Early Days to the Present (Los Angeles: Historic Record, 1923), 904.

29 Parker, Life and Adventures, 62; McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California.”

30 “Services Held for Pioneer Plainsman,” San Andreas (CA) Calaveras Prospect, November 24, 1934; Edna Bryan Buckbee, Pioneer Days of Angel’s Camp (Angel’s Camp, CA: Calaveras Californian, 1932), 51–52; Arkansas, Fulton County, Franklin Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 168B; California, Calaveras County, Township 8, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 99; family group sheets and other family information obtained from Osborne file, Calaveras County Historical Society, San Andreas, California; Mary Matzek, “Osborn Ranch: Keeping a Family Tradition,” Calaveras Enterprise, October 7, 1987. A later account claimed that George Osborne’s family was warned by George’s Mormon cousin Pickney Fowler that the train he was in would be attacked. Accordingly the Osborne family with some others separated from the train and took the northern route. “Services Held for Pioneer Plainsman.”

31 “Descendants of David Page,” typescript, copy at LDS Church History Library provided by Gerrald Lynch of Rogers, Arkansas; Arkansas, Madison County, Kings River, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 273; Eileen Illum, “Ancestors of Peter Illum,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=eliaslankford&id=I48969 (accessed April 5, 2007). According to family tradition, John Page’s train was warned by Mormons in Salt Lake City not to take the southern route as it was dangerous.

32 McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Township 1, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 108; Suzanne D. Rogers, “Parker-Hickman Farmstead, Buffalo National River, Arkansas,” May 1987, pp. 42, 45, typescript in possession of Ron Loving, copy at LDS Church History Library; Barbara Goin and Pat Trask, Cemetery Records: Visalia, Tulare County, California, Deaths Before 1920 [n.p.: n.d.], copy at LDS Family History Library; “Parker Family DNA Project: Descendants of Thomas and Mary Bostin Parker,” as accessed at http://www.utk.edu/~corn/parkerdna/p27.htm (accessed October 10, 2007).

33 Parker, Life and Adventures; B. G. Parker, Recollections of the Mountain Meadow Massacre (Plano, CA: Fred W. Reed, 1901); McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 108; “‘Uncle Bass’ Parker Dead,” Visalia Daily Times, May 19, 1903; “Bassil G. Parker Dies in Tulare at an Advanced Age after a Short Illness,” Daily Visalia Delta, May 20, 1903; “A Mooney Memento—And More,” Los Tulares no. 179 (March 1993): 1-2; “Parker Family DNA Project: Descendants of Thomas and Mary Bostin Parker”; Ratten, “American (Mostly) Trees, Roots, Twigs and Branches.”

34 Parker, Life and Adventures, 81–82; McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California”; California, Tulare County, Visalia, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 99; California, Tulare County, Visalia, 1870 U.S. Census, population schedule, 289; Shirley McFadzean, “Cecil and Hatfield,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2002912&id=I06 (accessed June 20, 2008); “Parker Family DNA Project: Descendants of Thomas and Mary Bostin Parker.”

35 [Myron Angle], A Memorial and Biographical History of the Counties of Fresno, Tulare, and Kern, California (Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1891), 556; Paul E. Vandor, History of Fresno County, California (Los Angeles: Historical Record, 1919), 2427; Arkansas, Newton County, Prairie Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 2; California, Fresno County, Township No. 3, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 12; Ancestral File v4.19.

36 [Angle], Memorial and Biographical History, 556; Vandor, History of Fresno County, 2427; Arkansas, Newton County, Prairie Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 2–2B; California, Fresno County, Township No. 3, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 12 (Samuel B. Perry only); Nancy D. Jones, “Jones Brady Copeland Perry,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dotsicle&id=I3340 (accessed June 20, 2008).

37 Douglas McEuen, The Legend of Francis Marion Poteet and the Mountain Meadows Massacre—History of the Poteet Family (Pleasanton, TX: Zabava Printing, 1996), 58, 121, 122, 135; California, Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 377; Texas, Atascosa County, District 3, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 299D; Carpenter, “Trip Across the Plains in an Ox Wagon, 1857,” 161–69; Parker, Life and Adventures, 64–67; Bill Jones, “Casbeer Jones Family Research,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=casbeerjones&id=I38325 (accessed July 22, 2008). Referred to as Peteat and Pitteat in Francis M. Rowan and Fielding Wilburn, depositions, October 24, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah. The 1990 Mountain Meadows Monument lists the “Poteet Family” with “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

38 Census records indicate that Jasper Poteet was born in the Utah Territory about 1857. California, Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 377. Family records place his birth date on March 31, 1858, in Nevada. McEuen, Legend of Francis Marion Poteet, 122, 156.

39 Francis M. Rowan and Fielding Wilburn, depositions, October 24, 1860, Papers Pertaining to Utah; McEuen, Legend of Francis Marion Poteet, 58; California, Tuolumne County, Township 1, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 233; California, Tulare County, Kaweah And Mineral King, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 14D; Arkansas, Johnson County, Piney Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 1036. The 1990 Mountain Meadows Monument lists the “Poteet Brothers” with “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

40 Ala Martin, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 19, 1877, 45th Congress, 2nd Session, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy of transcript in LDS Church History Library; Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 1459, October 15, 1877; Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 18, 1877; Thurston, deposition, May 2, 1911, Malinda Thurston v. The United States and Ute Indian; Tinkham, History of San Joaquin County, 904; California, San Joaquin County, Elkhorn Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 963; California, San Joaquin, Elliott Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 167D; Rick Short, “Short,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3084889&id=I2818 (accessed December 5, 2006).

41 Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 1459, October 15, 1877; Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 18, 1877; Thurston, deposition, May 2, 1911, Malinda Thurston v. The United States and Ute Indian; Richard Thomas Scott, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 19, 1877, 45th Congress, 2nd Session, National Archives, Washington D.C., copy of transcript in LDS Church History Library; Ala Martin, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 19, 1877; “Mrs. M. Thurston Has Passed Away,” Stockton Daily Evening Record, December 15, 1921; Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 158B. Malinda remarried Hiram H. Thurston in California and is found with her children in California, San Joaquin County, O’Neal Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 940; California, San Joaquin County, Elliott Township, 1880 U.S. Census, population schedule, 167D.

42 According to Malinda Cameron Scott Thurston, Susan Scott was born just outside Salt Lake City, about four days after the death of Henry D. Scott. Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 1459, October 15, 1877; Thurston, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 18, 1877.

43 Scott, affidavit in support of H.R. 3945, December 19, 1877; Thurston, deposition, May 2, 1911, Malinda Thurston v. The United States and Ute Indian; California, San Joaquin County, Stockton, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 1079.

44 Collins, “Mountain Meadows Wagon Train,” 38; Arkansas, Newton County, White Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 3B; Carri L. Holt, “My Family,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cuzncarri&id=I03471 (accessed July 22, 2008). The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (Alf?) Smith, listed under “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

45 Vicki A. Roberts and Mysty T. McPherson, Genealogies of Marion County Families, 1811-1900 (Yellville, AR: Historica Genealogical Society of Marion County Arkansas, 1997), 469; Earl Berry, History of Marion County (Little Rock, AR: Marion County Historical Association, 1977), 273; Betty Ramsey to Brian Reeves, June 3, 2002, Mountain Meadows Massacre Research Files; S. C. Turnbo, Ozark Frontier Stories, indexed by Carrie Basch (n.p., 1979), 1:288–90; S. C. Turnbo, “A Part of an Account of the Coker Family Biographical and Historical,” available at http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/turnbo/V18/ST550.html (accessed July 22, 2008); Arkansas, Marion County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 318B; Charles Stallcup is found listed in the household of his mother Jane Stallcup in Missouri, Jackson County, Blue Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 342; Missouri, Jackson County, Fort Osage Township, 1870 U.S. Census, population schedule, 240; Indian Territory, Chickasaw Nation, Township 7, 1900 U.S. Census, population schedule, ED 177, sheet 19B; Census record for Winnie Wood Stallcup, the wife of Charles Stallcup and sister of Solomon and William Wood, Arkansas, Marion County, Sugar Loaf Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 668.

46 Parker, Life and Adventures, 66; Arkansas, Johnson County, Mulberry Township, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 129B; “A Boy Shot by Indians,” Stockton Daily Argus, October 10, 1857.

47 “Lee’s Victims.”

48 Parker, Life and Adventures, 61; McFadzean and Lancastor, “1857 Wagon Train Arkansas to California.”

49 Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 159B–160; Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships”; Wasson family file located at the Fayetteville, Arkansas Public Library; History of Benton, Washington, Carroll, Madison, Crawford, Franklin, and Sebastian Counties, Arkansas (Chicago: Goodspeed Publishing, 1889), 902–3, 1035; Cyndee, “Cyndee’s Tree,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cyndeetut&id=I13765 (accessed July 22, 2008).

Part III: Other Names Associated with the Baker and Fancher Companies

The names in this section are of persons often tied to the emigrant companies for whom there is no conclusive evidence they traveled with them or were killed at Mountain Meadows.

The lists are arranged alphabetically by family name and then by age within each immediate family group. Children’s names are indented after the names of their parents. Listed after each name is the person’s age at the time of the massacre. Ages are approximated from federal census records and other available family history resources. Letters at the end of each entry indicate which individuals were memorialized as victims of the massacre on monuments in Harrison, Arkansas, and at Mountain Meadows, as well as in a program published for the 1999 memorial service at Mountain Meadows. H designates the Harrison, Arkansas, monument, dedicated in November 1955; M the Mountain Meadows monument, dedicated September 15, 1990; and MS the program for the memorial service held when some of the victims’ remains were re-interred at Mountain Meadows on September 10, 1999.

African American slaves. Family tradition suggests that some of the slave-holding families took slaves with them; however, there is no direct documentation to support these claims.1

Basham. The Poteets were related to the Bashams, and it was reported that a Basham was traveling with them, though it is unknown whether he made it to California with the Poteets or was killed at Mountain Meadows.2 M,MS
Bradford, E. W. Bradford’s brother wrote to Utah Governor Alfred Cumming after hearing news of the recovery of the surviving emigrant children. He asked for information concerning his brother and his brother’s young family, who had left for California in 1857, had not been heard from since, and were feared to be among the “ill fated victims.”3
Bradford, (Wife).
Charley.
Daughter.
Fawcett, Zebulon P., 21. He claimed to have left the doomed emigrants at Mountain Meadows and, when the rest of the train did not catch up, supposedly returned to the Meadows to discover their bodies. It is unlikely that he did so, however, since he traveled the main emigrant trail to northern California.4

Grover, Ortensa S., 18. Family legend claims that Ortensa Grover, a young girl with long blonde hair and blue eyes, was traveling to California with the Arkansas companies to become a nanny.5

Haydon. Frank King identified a Haydon traveling with the Arkansas companies. Some of the names Frank King gave have not been verified from other sources as traveling with the train. If there was a Haydon traveling with the train, it is unknown whether he continued to California along the northern road or was among the group that went south and perished at Mountain Meadows.6 H,M,MS

Jones, William B., age unknown. Shortly after the massacre, a Paiute leader named Jackson reportedly had in his possession a journal of a William B. Jones of Caldwell County, Missouri, but refused to part with it.7

Laffoon Family. Some people surnamed Laffoon may have hired on as drovers but do not appear to have been killed at Mountain Meadows.8 H,M,MS

Larramore, James, 29. Brother-in-law of William and Solomon Wood, who died in the massacre, and related to Charles Stallcup by marriage. He may have hired on from Marion County as a drover.9

Methodist minister. Some sources claim a minister traveled with the company. Although the preacher’s identity is unknown, it is possible he could be one of the victims already named. Some have assumed the minister of the train was Pleasant Tackitt. Pleasant Tackitt did have an uncle of the same name who was a famous Methodist circuit preacher, but he stayed in Arkansas and later moved to Texas.10

Morton Family. Frank King named a Morton family as being with the Arkansas companies.11 H,M,MS

Reed Family. According to Paxton Jacoby, the Reeds, including “Reed senior and his family and his son and family,” were among the leading families of the company and, with the Bakers, “the principal owners of the stock.” Jacoby claimed the Reed family was from Missouri. No family matching Jacoby’s description has been identified.12 M,MS

Reeder Family. Charles Reeder, his wife, and three of his nephews, one of whom was named Samuel Reeder, reportedly left their home in Iowa in company with Zebulon Fawcett. Though there are claims that they joined the Arkansas company on the trail and were killed at Mountain Meadows, they actually may have avoided the massacre if they traveled with Fawcett and took the northern road to California as he did.13

Smith Family. Frank King named a Smith family as traveling with the Arkansas emigrants.14 H,MS

Sorel Family. The idea that a Sorel family was with the Arkansas companies apparently arose because the surviving Miller children were originally identified with the surname “Sorel” when they were recovered by Indian Agent Jacob Forney in 1859. The Fanchers did have ties to Sorrels, and there was a Sorrels family living in Crawford County, Arkansas; however, there is no evidence linking them to the Arkansas companies.15 H

Stevenson. Frank King listed a Stevenson among the Arkansas companies. A John Stevenson came through Salt Lake City with three hundred head of cattle en route to Santa Clara County, California, in 1857. As yet, no tie has been established between John Stevenson and the massacred emigrants.16H,M,MS

Notes

1 Slaves were taken to care for the children and assist in driving the cattle and oxen according to Roger V. Logan, “The Mountain Meadows Massacre,” in Mountain Heritage: Some Glimpses into Boone County’s Past after One Hundred Years, ed. Roger v. Logan Jr. (Harrison, AR: Times Publishing, 1969), 25–26; Isabelle Minnie Evins Kratz, “The Mountain Meadow Massacre,” The Klingensmith Scrapbook, comp. Anna Jean Duncan Backus (1996), 161. See also “Lee’s Victims,” San Francisco Chronicle, March 23, 1877. John T. Baker had seven slaves according to Arkansas, Carroll County, Jefferson Township, 1850 U.S. Census, slave schedule, 115. John T. Baker’s widow Mary Baker owned nine slaves according to Arkansas, Carroll County, Crooked Creek Township, 1860 U.S. Census, slave schedule, 4. It should be noted, however, that even though slaves were still considered property in Arkansas in 1860, no depositions from family members requesting compensation from the federal government for property lost made mention of any slaves. Likewise, no witnesses who saw the wagon train or traveled with them mentioned any African Americans or slaves traveling with the Baker or Fancher companies.

2 Fielding Wilburn, deposition, October 24, 1860, Papers Pertaining to the Territory of Utah, 1849-70, 36th Congress, Records of the Senate, RG 46, National Archives, Washington, D.C.; Douglas McEuen, The Legend of Francis Marion Poteet and the Mountain Meadows Massacre—History of the Poteet Family (Pleasanton, TX: Zabava Printing, 1996), 58. Douglas McEuen speculated that Basham may have avoided the massacre by continuing with the Poteets toward California rather than staying at the Mountain Meadows. The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (George D.?) Basham with “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

3 George C. Bradford to Alfred Cumming, April 1, 1859, 1859 Correspondence, Alfred Cumming Papers, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, microfilm copy located at Church History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah [hereafter cited as LDS Church History Library].

4 Frances [Fawcett] Haynes to Mrs. E. A. Brush, October 2, 1935, LDS Church History Library; Frances [Fawcett] Haynes to Bancroft Library, July 19, 1932, Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley; California, Siskiyou County, Yreka Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 152.

5 Diana Dowden to Brian Reeves, January 25, 2003, p. 3, LDS Church History Library; Diana Dowden, telephone interview with Craig L. Foster, May 20, 2003; Family Group Sheet prepared January 15, 2003, by Bernadine E. Murphy Nielsen; New York, Otsego County, Middlefield, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 108B.

6 Josiah F. Gibbs, The Mountain Meadows Massacre (Salt Lake City: Salt Lake Tribune, 1910), 13. The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (James C.?) Haydon, listed under “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

7 “Our Los Angeles Correspondence,” Daily Alta California, October 27, 1857. It should be noted that there was a William Jones from Carroll County, Arkansas that arrived in Marysville, California (by way of the main California Trail into northern California) with “17 persons, 4 wagons, and 100 head of young cattle,” in early October of 1857. “Another Train,” Sacramento Daily Bee, October 7, 1857. Another possibility for the identity of William B. Jones is found in the 1860 federal census for San Joaquin County, California, which lists a William Jones from Arkansas living close to Samuel L. Martin, who left the Baker train at Salt Lake City. See California, San Joaquin County, Elkhorn Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 963.

8 Roger V. Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships,” broadside of familial relationships of the Baker-Fancher emigrant party, September 9, 2001, copy located in Mountain Meadows Massacre Research Files, LDS Church History Library; Lawrence G. Coates, “Fancher Party Before the Mountain Meadows Massacre,” 28, paper presented at the Mormon History Conference in St. George, UT, May 1992, copy in authors’ possession; Arkansas, Carroll County, Jefferson Township, 1850 U S. Census, population schedule, 172. The 1990 Mountain Meadows monument lists the “Lafoon Family” under “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

9 Vicki A. Roberts and Mysty T. McPherson, Genealogies of Marion County Families, 1811-1900 (Yellville, AR: Historica Genealogical Society of Marion County Arkansas, 1997), 469, 492; Earl Berry, History of Marion County (Little Rock, AR: Marion County Historical Association, 1977), 273; Census record for Dicey Larramore, the wife of James Larramore and sister of Solomon and William Wood, Arkansas, Marion County, Sugar Loaf Township, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 668. James Larramore is notably absent from the 1860 Census record for his wife.

10 C. F. McGlashan, “The Mountain Meadow Massacre,” Sacramento Daily Record, January 1, 1875; Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 13; Arkansas, Pope County, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 241B; Texas, Parker County, Beat No. 9, 1860 U.S. Census, population schedule, 465B.

11 Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 13. The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (Charles H.?) Morton Family, listed under “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

12 “Lee’s Victims.” A possible candidate is William Findley Reid, who with his wife and fourteen children, traveled from Arkansas to California in 1857. Reid, however, took the main California Trail to northern California and settled in Yolo County. As yet, no tie has been established between this family and the Baker or Fancher trains. Tom Gregory, History of Yolo County, California (Los Angeles: Historic Record Company, 1913), 418–21; A Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California (Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1891), 794. The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (John Perkins?) Reed, listed under “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”

13 Josephine Kenner, et. al., History of Chelsea, Iowa: Centennial, 1864–1964 (n.p., [1964]), 139; Varla Wright to David Putnam, February 2004, transcript in LDS Church History Library; Frances [Fawcett] Haynes to Mrs. E. A. Brush, October 2, 1935, LDS Church History Library; Debra Baisch, “Sandy’s Family,” Rootsweb’s WorldConnect, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2414743&id=I515694986 (accessed April 4, 2007).

14 Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 13.

15 Alexander Wilson to Jacob Forney, June 27, 1859, in U.S. Congress, Senate, Message of the President of the United States, Communicating, in Compliance witha Resolution of the Senate, Information in Relation to the Massacre at Mountain Meadows, and Other Massacres in Utah Territory, 36th Cong., 1st sess., 1860, S. Doc. 42, p. 64; Editorial, Salt Lake City Valley Tan, June 29, 1859; Forney to Greenwood, August 1859, in Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 79; J. Forney to A. B. Greenwood, November 2, 1859, Senate, Message of the President, Doc. 42, p. 91; Mitchell, “Episode on the Road to Zion,” 18; Logan, “Wagon Train Kinships.” Although there is not enough strong evidence that any Sorrel or Sorrels family traveled with the Baker-Fancher companies, it should be noted that Alexander Fancher’s brother John Fancher reportedly married Ann Sorrels, thus making a connection between the Fancher and Sorrels families. One possible family that could have traveled with the emigrant train, if there were any Sorrels with them at all, was that of William Sorrels, 34, of Van Buren, Crawford County, Arkansas. Other members of his household include his wife Amelia A., 33, and children William M., 11, Sarah E., 9, Mary D., 7, and another relative Joseph Sorrels, 31. Eleanor Brodnax, “Fancher Kin to Hold First Reunion,” Arizona Republic, November 25, 26, 1957; Arkansas, Crawford County, Van Buren, 1850 U.S. Census, population schedule, 356B.

16 Gibbs, Mountain Meadows Massacre, 13; James Miller Guinn, Historical and Biographical Record of Southern California containing a History of Southern California from its Earliest Settlement to the Opening Year of the Twentieth Century (Chicago: Chapman Publishing, 1902), 899. The name on the 1990 Mountain Meadows monument is (Mordecai?) Stevenson, listed under “Other Names Associated with the Caravan.”